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The best Fujifilm cameras in 2022, from x-mount mirrorless to medium format

(Image credit: Rod Lawton)

The best Fujifilm cameras have helped reshape and redefine the whole camera market. The Fujifilm X100V is a retro-inspired compact that combines old-school camera design with the latest tech, the Fujifilm X-mount cameras are some of the best APS-C mirrorless cameras you can buy and the GFX range has made medium format achievable for everyone, not just successful professionals.

Fujifilm is probably best known for its X-series mirrorless cameras, and these include high-end pro models like the Fujifilm X-T4, retro classics like the X-Pro3 and much cheaper X-E4, and all-round affordable cameras for enthusiasts like the X-T30 II and X-S10.

The big news right now, of course, is that Fujifilm has launched a new flagship X-mount model, the X-H2S. We have been able to try this camera out already for our hands-on review and will shortly get a chance for a longer try-out with this camera and some of Fujifilm's new lenses too. We'll bring out a full review just as soon as we have put this camera through our lab tests, and you can be sure it's going to figure pretty high in this buying guide when our testing is complete.

These are likely to be the most popular models in the Fujifilm range, but we've also included the beautiful Fujifilm X100V. This is a fixed-lens compact that looks and handles like a classic film camera. It's slim enough to slide into a jacket pocket and unobtrusive enough for all kinds of street and event photography.

And we also have to include two of Fujifilm's medium format GFX cameras. These are larger and more specialized, but quite incredible in their own way. The GFX 50S II costs less than many high-end full frame cameras, and the mighty 102MP GFX 100S doubles the resolution of top full frame models, matches them for autofocus features, in-body stabilization and 4K video, yet costs little more.

So, Fujifilm has it all: cameras for beginners, enthusiasts and experts. Fujifilm cameras come and go quite frequently, so this list is kept regularly up to date with all the models available now. One thing to note: this list focuses on digital cameras, so if you want to try out Fujifilm's Instax range of Polaroid-style instant cameras, you'll find plenty of them in our guide to the best instant cameras (opens in new tab)

The best Fujifilm camera in 2022

(Image credit: Rod Lawton/Digital Camera World)
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If we had to pick one top-value Fujifilm camera to suit everyone, this would be it

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: APS-C
Megapixels: 26.1MP
Lens mount: Fujifilm X
Screen: 3-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 1.04m dots
Viewfinder: EVF, 2,360k dots
Max continuous shooting speed: 30/8fps
Max video resolution: 4K
User level: Intermediate/Expert

Reasons to buy

+
Small size & excellent build quality
+
Vari-angle touchscreen
+
In-body image stabilisation

Reasons to avoid

-
Conventional mode dial

The Fujifilm X-S10 is probably the best all-rounder in the Fujifilm stable right now, and is therefore our strongest pick for the majority of users. It's got a full-articulated screen and generally handles very well, despite having fewer external control dials and buttons compared to other cameras in the X-series. Having IBIS (in-body stabilization) is also a huge bonus, making it easier to shoot hand-held with slower shutter speeds, which is hugely useful for low-light work. In terms of APS-C cameras, we're hard pressed to think of one that offers a better balance of features, performance and price than the Fujifilm X-S10, and that's why it's our top pick. 

Read more:Fujifilm X-S10 review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Rod Lawton/Digital Camera World)
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If you prefer Fujifilm's more classic exposure controls, the X-T30 II delivers retro style AND real value

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: APS-C
Megapixels: 26.1MP
Lens mount: Fujifilm X
Screen: 3in tilting touchscreen, 1,620k dots
Viewfinder: EVF, 2,360k dots
Max continuous shooting speed: 30fps
Max video resolution: 4K
User level: Intermediate/Expert

Reasons to buy

+
Small size & traditional design
+
Improved autofocus

Reasons to avoid

-
Small update over (cheaper) X-T30
-
Still no in-body stabilisation

The Fujifilm X-T30 has been one of the firm's most popular cameras for quite some time, packing bits and pieces of pro-level tech into a body that is sized and priced for a more casual user. This X-T30 II is not a huge upgrade on the original X-T30, instead it's a minor refresh, with a larger screen and inherited autofocus technology from the flagship X-T4. It's clearly designed to mollify those who have been champing at the bit for an X-T40, and it should just about manage that. Capable of creating gorgeous-looking images, especially with the various film simulation modes, the X-T30 II is a hugely pleasurable camera to use. It's not much of an upgrade on the original X-T30, which is still widely available, so if it's a little beyond your budget, that camera might be the better option.

• Read more:Fujifilm X-T30 II review

(Image credit: Rod Lawton)
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If money is no object and you want the best, the X-T4 is the ultimate professional tool – until the X-H2S hits the market!

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: APS-C
Megapixels: 26.1MP
Lens mount: Fujifilm X
Screen: 3in articulating touchscreen, 1,620k dots
Viewfinder: EVF, 3.69 million dots
Max continuous shooting speed: 30/15fps
Max video resolution: 4K
User level: Expert/professional

Reasons to buy

+
6.5-stop in-body stabilisation
+
4K video at up to 60/50p
+
High-speed shooting

Reasons to avoid

-
New and expensive

The Fujifilm X-T4 is a firm favorite at DCW for several reasons. It's possible the best and most sophisticated APS-C camera you can buy thanks to its 6.5 stops of in-body image stabilization, 4K video, extensive range of codecs, super-fast burse speeds, a responsive EVF viewfinder, its full articulated screen and its impressive battery life. The sensor is a 26.1-megapixel X-Trans sensor which is more than enough resolution for most people and it can shoot really high quality 4K too. The initial RRP is a bit higher than its predecessor (the Fujifilm X-T3) but you are getting a lot more for your money. There's been no announcement in regards to the Fujifilm X-T5 yet but with the constant improvements and upgrades, we're excited already!

Read more:Fujifilm X-T4 review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Digital Camera World)
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The X-Pro 3 is also the 'best', but for retro camera fans who want both the look and experience of old-school cameras

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: APS-C
Megapixels: 26.1MP
Lens mount: Fujifilm X
Screen: 3in tilting touchscreen, 1,620k dots
Viewfinder: Hybrid OVF (95% cov, x0.52 mag) and OLED EVF (100% cov, x0.66 mag, 3.69m dots)
Max continuous shooting speed: 11fps mechanical shutter, 20fps electronic, 30fps with crop
Max video resolution: 4K UHD
User level: Enthusiast/Professional

Reasons to buy

+
Superb retro design
+
Hybrid optical/electronic viewfinder
+
Novel 'hidden' screen

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive and specialised

Styled on a classic rangefinder camera but featuring the latest digital technology, The Fujifilm X-Pro 3 is aimed at people who want a retro camera with modern features. The X-Pro 3 includes the latest 26.1MP X-Trans sensor, improved autofocus and a unique screen design. Instead of having a screen that always shows an image, it has a screen that folds flat against the body and using a small digital screen imitates film packet slots on the back of film cameras. The hybrid electrical/optical viewfinder makes it stand out from other Fujifilm cameras as it offers a fully electronic mode, an optical mode with electronic overlays and a digital rangefinder mode. The Fujifilm X-Pro 3 comes in black, Dura black or Dura silver. The Dura models come with a surface-hardening technology called Duratect which is applied to achieve strong scratch resistance so it will look brand new for longer. Released in 2019, the Fujifilm X-Pro3 has retained its high price point, otherwise, it might appear higher in the list. This is certainly a camera that you would buy if you're looking for something a little more specialist.

Read more:Fujifilm X-Pro3 review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Rod Lawton/Digital Camera World)
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The X-Pro3 is big and pricey, but the little X-E4 delivers much of the same 'rangefinder' style is a smaller, simpler and cheaper form

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: APS-C
Megapixels: 26.1MP
Lens mount: Fujifilm X
Screen: 3-in tilting touchscreen, 1,620k dots
Viewfinder: EVF, 2.36m dots
Max continuous shooting speed: 8/10fps
Max video resolution: 4K
User level: Enthusiast

Reasons to buy

+
Compact size
+
Physical exposure controls
+
Same image quality as X-T4

Reasons to avoid

-
No in-body stabilization
-
Awkward with larger zooms

At first glance, the Fujifilm X-E4 might seem very similar to the X-T4 but in reality, it's quite a different camera. While the X-T4 is aimed at professionals looking for a decent all-rounder, the X-E4 is more aimed at enthusiasts or travel photographers who want something compact and portable but with the handling of a traditional camera. The X-E4 features the same sensor and focussing system as the X-T4 but it doesn't include IBIS. Unlike the X-T4, the X-E4 is a rangefinder-style camera which, a bit like Marmite, some people love and some people hate. The X-E4 comes in a kit with the Fujifilm XF 27mm f/2.8 lens which not only looks and feels well made, it also delivers high-end performance. The X-E4 comes in either black or silver and it works best with Fujifilm's prime lenses.

Read more:Fujifilm X-E4 review (opens in new tab).

(Image credit: Rod Lawton/Digital Camera World)
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The X100V is a classically designed compact camera with a fixed 35mm equivalent lens and has its own cult following

Specifications

Type: Compact
Sensor: APS-C
Megapixels: 26.1MP
Lens: 35mm f/2 (effective)
Screen: 3in tilting LCD, 1,620k dots
Viewfinder: Optical + 3,690k-dot EVF
Max continuous shooting speed: 20 / 11fps
Max video resolution: 4K
User level: Enthusiast

Reasons to buy

+
Hybrid viewfinder
+
Sumptuous image quality

Reasons to avoid

-
No optical stabilisation
-
Pretty pricey

Fujifilm's original X100 was the camera that sparked people's obsession with Fujifilm's retro-styled modern cameras. Five models later, the Fujifilm X100V is still a very popular choice for those who want a premium camera without the faff of changing lenses. With a street-friendly fixed lens equivalent to 35mm, it makes it the perfect camera for street photographers or portrait photographers alike. It possesses the same exceptional build quality of all Fujifilm cameras in a small, pocketable version that makes it ever so portable. It has the same 26.1MP X-Trans sensor as the X-T4 and the same hybrid viewfinder as in the X-Pro 3. The X100V might just be the most advanced, APS-C fixed lens camera on the market and certainly aimed at enthusiasts but its slick design and up-to-date features don't come cheap. 

Read more: Fujifilm X100V review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Fujifilm)
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The GFX 50S II offers an incredibly affordable entry into medium format and delivers superb results

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Medium format
Megapixels: 51.4MP
Lens mount: Fujifilm G
Screen: 3.2in three-way tilting touchscreen, 2,360k dots
Viewfinder: EVF, 3.69 million dots
Max continuous shooting speed: 3fps
Max video resolution: Full HD
User level: Expert/professional

Reasons to buy

+
Affordable for medium format
+
Ergonomically designed body
+
Stunning images

Reasons to avoid

-
No 4K video

Fujifilm revolutionised the world of medium format with its mirrorless GFX series of comparatively small and relatively affordable large-sensor cameras. The GFX 50S II is perhaps the best distillation of the formula yet, cramming a gorgeous 51.4MP sensor into a body that's actually portable. What's new with this model though is the 6.5-stop image stabilisation system, improved over the other GFX cameras and further expanding the camera's real-world usability. This also enables the inclusion of a Pixel Shift Multi-Shot mode, which combines16 RAW images to create huge 200MP files. The GFX 50S II has a burst rate of just 3fps, and can only shoot Full HD video at 30p, but Fujifilm has correctly divined that nobody is buying this camera for its action-shooting or video capabilities. It does what it's designed to do and does it exceptionally well.

Read more:Fujifilm GFX 50S II review

(Image credit: Rod Lawton/Digital Camera World)
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It's the medium format camera with everything, including 4K, IBIS, phase AF, 102MP and a VERY competitive price

Specifications

Sensor: Medium format
Megapixels: 102MP
Lens mount: Fujifilm G
LCD: 3.2-inch 2-axis touchscreen, 2.36 million dots
Viewfinder: EVF, 3.69 million dots
Max continuous shooting speed: 5fps
Max video resolution: 4K at 30fps
User level: Professional

Reasons to buy

+
Surprisingly compact and affordable
+
102MP images
+
Snappy AF performance
+
Improved image stabilization

Reasons to avoid

-
Still heavy for long handheld use
-
8-way joystick takes getting used to

Fujifilm is doing something for medium format photography that no other brand has managed. It's made the luxury of having a 100MP sensor more affordable while maintaining incredible image quality, fast autofocus and a high-end build. The GFX100S has a more compact body than the original GFX 100 but doesn't compromise on sensor resolution or in-body stabilization. Somehow, Fujifilm has managed to make a camera that delivers everything the original GFX100 could deliver, only in a smaller body and at not much more than half the price. It's the kind of camera wizardry we live for and there's no surprise it made it into our top ten.

Read more:Fujifilm GFX 100S review (opens in new tab)

How we test cameras

We test cameras both in real-world shooting scenarios and in carefully controlled lab conditions. Our lab tests measure resolution, dynamic range and signal to noise ratio. Resolution is measured using ISO resolution charts, dynamic range is measured using DxO Analyzer test equipment and DxO Analyzer is also used for noise analysis across the camera's ISO range. We use both real-world testing and lab results to inform our comments in buying guides.

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Rod is the Group Reviews editor for Digital Camera World and across Future's entire photography portfolio, with decades of experience with cameras of all kinds. Previously he has been technique editor on N-Photo, Head of Testing for the photography division and Camera Channel editor on TechRadar. He has been writing about photography technique, photo editing and digital cameras since they first appeared, and before that began his career writing about film photography. He has used and reviewed practically every interchangeable lens camera launched in the past 20 years, from entry-level DSLRs to medium format cameras, together with lenses, tripods, gimbals, light meters, camera bags and more.